frontpagebutton

Frontline’s Questions of the Week: In order to build a strong and coordinated social media push around these different initiatives, FHWC has thematically organized a social media push over the next month: each week, you are encouraged to join us in tweeting, posting blogs, and sharing relevant newspaper articles which offers insights into a weekly question posed by the Frontline Health Workers Coalition that week. These questions have been designed to align with the major discussions and events that will be occurring that week. Use the hashtag #healthworkerscount to connect with these online discussions. Click here to read more about how you can get involved.

Frontline Health Workers’ Lifesaving Potential 

Frontline health workers are those directly providing services where they are most needed, especially in remote and rural areas. They are the first and often only link to essential health services for millions in developing countries. Many are community health workers and midwives, though they can also include local pharmacists, nurses and doctors who serve in community clinics. Properly trained and supported frontline health workers hold the potential to save millions of lives. Read more →

Why the Coalition?

The Frontline Health Workers Coalition is an alliance of United States-based organizations working together to urge greater and more strategic U.S. investment in frontline health workers in developing countries as a cost-effective way to save lives and foster a healthier, safer and more prosperous world. Read more →

U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)-supported frontline health worker Ozara Husseini (left) talks to Najiba, who has five children, about the advantages of family planning and Najiba's decisions to start taking the pill at their home in Katasank near Bamyan, Afghanistan, on the June 8, 2010. Courtesy Kate Holt/Jhpiego.

U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)-supported frontline health worker Ozara Husseini (left) talks to Najiba, who has five children, about the advantages of family planning and Najiba’s decisions to start taking the pill at their home in Katasank near Bamyan, Afghanistan, on the June 8, 2010. Courtesy Kate Holt/Jhpiego.

“If more leaders work together to deploy more frontline health workers, more women and children will survive. But they also should ensure better support for those already on the frontlines – health workers who sometimes lack the information, skills, equipment and supplies they need to save more lives.”

Melinda Gates, Co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation